CFP: Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy

Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy

 

Fifth Edition: 28-29 November 2014

Keynote speakers:

John Henry (University of Edinburgh)
Arianna Borrelli (Technical University of Berlin)

 

The Center for Logic and History & Philosophy of Science at the University of Bucharest is organizing its fifth graduate conference for advanced master and PhD students working on early modern philosophy. The event will be held on November 28-29, 2014 at the University of Bucharest, Romania.

 

We cordially invite graduate students to submit abstracts on any topic related to early modern philosophy at bucharest.graduate.conference@gmail.com by August 20, 2014. Abstracts should not exceed 500 words and should be prepared for blind review. Papers will be given 40 minutes (30 minutes talk, 10 minutes open discussion). The Program Committee will notify authors of its decision by September 10.

 

Conference fee: € 40.

For any further questions, you can get in touch with us via email or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BucharestGradConference.

 

Workshop: Mechanicism, mathematics and experiment: Early modern intersections

Mechanicism, mathematics and experiment: Early modern intersections

16-17 January 2014

Faculty of Philosophy

Splaiul Independentei 204, Bucharest

 

Programme

Thusday 16 January
16.30-17.40 Catherine Goldstein (CNRS, Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu-PRG, Paris),

Baconian mathematics in Mersenne’s circle

17.40-18.50 Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest),

Francis Bacon’s experimental construction of “space”

Friday 17 January
10.00-11.10 Sophie Roux (ENS Paris),

What kind of mechanism for Cartesian physics?

11.10-11.30 break
11.30-12.40 Charles Wolfe (Ghent University),

Mechanism and mechanisms: ontological considerations in an early modern context, with a look at embodiment

12.40-15.00 lunch
15.00-16.10 Vlad Alexandrescu (University of Bucharest),

R. Descartes and J.B. Morin about the uses of the infinite (in French)

16.10-16.30 break
16.30-17.40 Tamas Demeter (Hungarian Academy of Science and University of Pécs),

Hume on the Limits and Prospects of Natural Philosophy

17.40-18.50 Tinca Prunea Bretonnet (Romanian Academy),

Kant on Mathematical Method and the Specificity of Philosophy in the Early 1760s

 

Event organized within the framework of the project From natural history to science: the emergence of experimental philosophy.

Lecture: Spiders, Ants and Bees: Francis Bacon’s Use of Sources

Wednesday,October 9, Doina-Cristina Rusu will give a lecture entitled “Spiders, Ants and Bees: Francis Bacon’s Use of Souces.” The conference wil take place at the Faculty of Philosophy (Amphitheater Titu Maiorescu), starting at 18:00.

Abstract:

Francis Bacon’s last writing, Sylva sylvarum, had been considered for a long time to be a commonplace book. Responsible for this classification is the big number of borrowings from secondary sources. My claim is that through a close comparison with these sources Sylva sylvarum can be depicted as a very original and important book within Bacon’s overall project for the reformation of natural philosophy. Using a metaphor, Bacon describes the work of natural philosophy as being the middle way between a spider and an ant. The spider creates webs only out of his substance, as a philosopher creating theories out of his mind, without confronting them with nature; while the ants only store and use natural things, like empirics, who use nature, but are not able to explain its phenomena. The bee, personification of the philosopher, takes things from nature, but they are transformed and digested. This presentation aims to prove that this was not only Bacon’s ideal of science, but it is exactly what he does in writing his Sylva sylvarum. Many of the theories existing in the sections of plants are the result of a work similar to that of a bee: the middle way between Giambattista della Porta, whose experiments and theories are the result of his own mind, as s spider’s web, and Hugh Platt, who experiments with nature, but does not have any theory about the inner processes of nature, as an ant only using objects. Comparing Sylva sylvarum with both these sources, Bacon’s originality will become evident and important conclusions about the way in which a natural philosophy must be constructed can be drawn.

Report for the 4th Bucharest Colloquium

4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science

Experiments and the Arts of Discovery in the Early Modern Europe

12-14 May 2013

Center for the Logic, History and the Philosophy of Science

Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest

This international colloquium has been organized within the framework of the research project From natural history to science: the emergence of experimental philosophy (CNCS grant PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0719, contract no. 294/05/10/2011). Our aim was to put together scholars working on various forms of early modern experimentation and explore several important themes about the sixteenth and seventeenth-century experiments. Among these themes, we would like to highlight the discussion of one of the most important sources of Francis Bacon’s natural histories, the work of the Italian natural philosopher Giovanni Battista della Porta (papers presented in the colloquium by Sergius Kodera and Arianna Borrelli), as well as setting the general framework of experimental natural history (Peter Anstey) and the new medical “experiments” of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (Evan Ragland). How Bacon and della Porta relate to each other with respect to experiments presented in their books – many of Bacon’s experiments form the Sylva Sylvarum are from Porta’s Magia naturalis – was part of another (larger) question we ask in our research project: what is “Baconian experimentation”? This question was explored within the first two days of the colloquium in round-up discussions (Dana Jalobeanu, Cesare Pastorino, Sebastian Mateiescu, Claudia Dumitru, James Everest, Mihnea Dobre, Oana Matei, and Richard Serjeantson). More of the context about Bacon’s philosophy was uncovered in the second day of our colloquium. Thus, Daniel Garber explored the relation between Bacon’s Latin natural histories and his Sylva. Sorana Corneanu examined the relation between traditional rhetoric and Baconian theory of imagination. Benedino Gemelli discussed the reception of Bacon and his experiments in the famous Dutch natural philosopher, Isaac Beeckman. Vlad Alexandrescu pointed out another possible connection between Bacon and René Descartes. The final day of the colloquium was opened by Mordechai Feingold’s lecture “What was the ‘Experimental Philosophy’?,” which raised several important problems that were discussed in the final round-up discussion “Experiments in Early Modern Philosophy: historical and historiographical questions” (Dana Jalobeanu, Cesare Pastorino, Peter Anstey). Although was not initially in the colloquium program, Roger Ariew presented a paper on Fromondus’s views about comets. Koen Vermeir explored how mathematics, imagination, and experiments lead to “mathematical experiments” in John Wilkins. Alberto Vanzo discussed a case of Italian experimental activities in the late seventeenth century.

This very brief overview is merely a glimpse into the many fruitful discussions that were generated by papers presented in the 4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science. Given the high quality of these papers, we are planning to publish a proceeding of this event.

Updated Program for the 4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science

4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science
Experiments and the Arts of Discovery in the Early Modern Europe

12-14 May 2013
Center for the Logic, History and the Philosophy of Science
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest

Program:

Sunday, May 12, 2013
Chair: Dana Jalobeanu (Bucharest)
09:30-10:30    Peter Anstey (Sydney), Experimental natural history (keynote lecture)
10:30-11:00    Coffee Break
11:00-12.00    Sergius Kodera (Vienna), The Laboratory as Stage: Giovanni Battista della Porta’s Experiments
12:00-13:00    Lunch Break
Chair: Cesare Pastorino (Sussex)
13:00-14:00    Arianna Borrelli (Wuppertal), The invisible technique: the emergence of transparent glass and the development of Giovan Battista Della Porta’s optical experiments
14:00-14:30    Coffee break
14:30-15:30    Evan Ragland (Alabama), Making Trials in Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth-Century Medicine
15:30-16:30    Jonathan Regier (Paris), Mathematics and experiment in Kepler’s De stella nova (1604)
16:30-17:00    Coffee break
17:00-19:00    Panel-discussion: Baconian experimentation  I (Proponents: Dana Jalobeanu, Cesare Pastorino, Sebastian Mateiescu, Claudia Dumitru, James Everest)

Monday, May 13, 2013
Chair: Roger Ariew (South Florida)
09:30-10:30    Daniel Garber (Princeton) Merchants of Light and Mystery Men: Bacon’s Last Projects in Natural History
10:30-11:00    Cofee break
11:00-12.00    Sorana Corneanu (Bucharest), Inquiry According to the Ancient Parables: Francis Bacon, the Imagination, and the Art of Direction.
12:00-13:00    Lunch break
Chair: Richard Serjeantson (Cambridge)
13.00-14.00    Benedino Gemelli (Bellinzona), Francis Bacon in Isaac Beeckman’s Journal
14:00-14:30    Coffee break
14:30-15:30    Vlad Alexandrescu (Bucharest), Descartes et le rêve (baconien) de “la plus haute et plus parfaite science”
15:30-16:00    Coffee break
16:00-18:00    Panel-discussion: Baconian experimentation II (Proponents: Mihnea Dobre, Oana Matei, Andrea Strazzoni, Adela Deanova)

Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Chair: Daniel Garber (Princeton)
09:30-10:30    Mordechai Feingold (Caltech), What was the “Experimental Philosophy’? (keynote lecture)
10:30-11:00    Coffee break
11:00-12.00    Albrecht Heeffer (Ghent), The use of material models in physico-mathematics
12:00-13:00    Lunch break
Chair: Peter Anstey (Sydney)
13.00-14.00     Koen Vermeir (Paris), John Wilkins’ mathematical experiments and the perpetuity of discovery (paper written together with Maarten Van Dyck)
14:00-14:30    Coffee break
14:30-15:30    Alberto Vanzo (Warwick), Experimental philosophy in late seventeenth-century Italy
15:30-16:00    Coffee break
16:00-18:00    Round-up discussion: Experiments in Early Modern Philosophy; historical and historiographical questions

4th Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy

The Center for the Logic, History and Philosophy of Science is organizing its fourth graduate conference for advanced master and PhD students working on early modern philosophy and on the history and philosophy of science. The event will be held on May 10-11, 2013  at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Bucharest (Splaiul Independenţei, 204).


Invited speakers:

  • Vlad Alexandrescu (University of Bucharest)
  • Peter Anstey (University of Sydney)
  • Richard Serjeantson (Trinity College, Cambridge),

Participants:

  • Daniel Collette (University of South Florida)
  • Claudia Dumitru (University of Bucharest)
  • Max Gavrilciuc (University of Bucharest)
  • Lucio Mare (University of South Florida)
  • Bennett McNulty (University of California, Irvine)
  • Michael Misiewicz (King’s College London)
  • Ville Paukkonen (University of Helsinki)
  • Dan Savinescu (Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj)
  • Daniel Schwartz (University of California San Diego)
  • Monica Solomon (University of Notre-Dame)
  • Aaron Spink (University of South Florida)
  • Sarah Tropper (King’s College London)
  • Dragoş Vădana (New Europe College)
  • Julia Weckend (University of Reading)

 Program Committee: Mihnea Dobre, Dana Jalobeanu, Sorin Costreie, Sorana Corneanu

 Organizing Committee: Dana Jalobeanu, Claudia Dumitru, Mihnea Dobre.

Programme:

Friday, May 10

9.00-9.30: Opening address, coffee

9.30-10.30: Richard Serjeantson: ‘Francis Bacon and the “Interpretation of Nature” in the Late Renaissance’

10.30-10.50: Coffee Break

10.50-11.30: Daniel Schwartz (University of California San Diego): Crucial Instances and Bacon’s Quest for Certainty

11.30-12.10: Claudia Dumitru (University of Bucharest): Crucial Experiments and Demonstrative Induction in Newton’s New Theory about Light and Colors

12.10-13.20: Lunch

13.20-14.00: Monica Solomon (University of Notre-Dame): Newton’s Mathematical Time Remains Hidden in Plain Sight

14.00 – 14.40: Lucio Mare (University of South Florida): Leibniz’ Soul Pointilism: from the Resurrection of Body to the Indestructibility of Bugs

14.40-15.00: Coffee Break

15.00-15.40: Sarah Tropper (King’s College, London): What ‘Matter’ Might Have Been for the Young (and Older) Leibniz

15.40-16.20: Julia Weckend (University of Reading): Leibniz on Ordinary Objects

16.20-16.40: Coffee Break

16:40-17.20: Ville Paukkonen (University of Helsinki): Berkeley’s Notion of Notion

17:20-17:30: Coffee Break

17:30-18:30: Vlad Alexandrescu: Some Remarks of an Intellectual Historian Facing a Herculean Task: Translating Anew Descartes’ Correspondence.

Saturday, May 11

9.30-10.30: Peter Anstey: The Problem of Necessity in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy

10.30-10.50: Coffee Break

10.50-11.30: Mike Misiewicz (King’s College, London): “The ‘geology’ of the Short Treatise: Tracing the evolution of Spinoza’s conception of the mind-body relationship”

11.30-12.10: Daniel Collette (University of South Florida): Pascal, Spinoza, and Defining “Cartesianism”

12.10-13.20: Lunch

13.20-14.00: Aaron Spink (University of South Florida): Descartes and the Eternal Truths

14.00 – 14.40: Max Gavrilciuc (University of Bucharest): The Angelic Mind in Descartes’ Replies to Burman and Henry More

14.40-15.00: Coffee Break

15.00-15.40: Dragos Vadana (New Europe College): The Innate Knowledge of God and the Limits of Natural Theology: Descartes and Voetius

15.40-16.20: Dan Savinescu (Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj): Plurality of Worlds and Philosophy of Language in the Writings of John Wilkins

16.20-16.40: Coffee Break

16:40-17:20Bennett McNulty (University of California, Irvine): Rehabilitating the Regulative Use of Reason. Kant on Empirical and Chemical Laws

4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science

4th Bucharest Colloquium in Early Modern Science

Experiments and the Arts of Discovery in the Early Modern Europe

12-14 May 2013

Center for the Logic, History and the Philosophy of Science

Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest

 

Program:

 

Sunday, May 12, 2013
Chair: Dana Jalobeanu (Bucharest)
10:00-11:00     Peter Anstey (Sydney), Experimental natural history (keynote lecture)
11:00-11:30     Coffee Break
11:30-12.30     Sergius Kodera (Vienna), The Laboratory as Stage: Giovanni Battista della Porta’s Experiments
12.30-13.30     Lunch Break
Chair: Cesare Pastorino (Sussex)
13.30-14.30     Arianna Borrelli (Wuppertal), The invisible technique: the emergence of transparent glass and the development of Giovan Battista Della Porta’s optical experiments
14.30-15:00     Coffee break
15:00-16:00     Evan Ragland (Alabama), Making Trials in Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth-Century Medicine
16:00-16:30     Coffee break
16:30-17:30     Jonathan Regier (Paris), Mathematics and experiment in Kepler’s De stella nova (1604)
17:30-18:00     Coffee break
18:00-19:00     Round-up discussion: Experiments in Early Modern Philosophy.
 

Monday, May 13, 2013
Chair: Roger Ariew (South Florida)
10:00-11:00     Daniel Garber (Princeton), Merchants of Light and Mystery Men: Bacon’s Last Projects in Natural History
11:00-11.30     Cofee break
11:30-12.30     Sorana Corneanu (Bucharest), Experimenting with the Operations of the Mind: Medicine and the ‘Intellectual Arts’
12:30-13:30     Lunch break
Chair: Richard Serjeantson (Cambridge)
13:30-14.30     Kathryn Murphy (Oxford), Strategies of Experimental Reading in Francis Bacon and Dean Christopher Wren
14.30-15:00     Coffee break
15:00-16:00     Vlad Alexandrescu (Bucharest), Descartes et le rêve (baconien) de “la plus haute et plus parfaite science”
16:00-16:30     Coffee break
16:30-19:00     Round-up discussion: Baconian experimentation (Proponents: Dana Jalobeanu, Cesare Pastorino, Mihnea Dobre, Oana Matei, Sebastian Mateiescu, Claudia Dumitru)
 

Tuesday, May 14, 2013
Chair: Daniel Garber (Princeton)
10:00-11:00     Mordechai Feingold (Caltech), What was the “Experimental Philosophy’? (keynote lecture)
11:00-11:30     Coffee break
11:30-12:30     Albrecht Heeffer (Ghent), The use of material models in physico-mathematics
12:30-13:30     Lunch break
Chair: Peter Anstey (Sydney)
13:30-14:30     Koen Vermeir (Paris),  John Wilkins’ mathematical experiments and the perpetuity of discovery
14:30-15:00     Coffee break
15:00-16:00     Benedino Gemelli (Bellinzona), Francis Bacon in Isaac Beeckman’s Journal
16:00-16:30     Coffee break
16:30-17:30     Alberto Vanzo (Warwick), Experimental philosophy in late seventeenth-century Italy
17:30-18:00     Coffee break
18:00-19:00     Round-up discussion (Cesare Pastorino)

The 4th Edition of the Bucharest Graduate Conference in Early Modern Philosophy

The Center for the Logic, History and Philosophy of Science is organizing its fourth graduate conference for advanced master and PhD students working on early modern philosophy and on the history and philosophy of science. The event will be held on May 10-11, 2013 at the University of Bucharest, Romania.

Invited speakers: 

  • Richard Serjeantson (Trinity College, Cambridge)
  • Peter Anstey (University of Sydney)
  • Vlad Alexandrescu (University of Bucharest)

Topics:

We welcome papers on any topic related to the early modern philosophy (roughly defined as spanning from the 15th to the 18th century) and especially those that treat this subject from the perspective of philosophy, history and/or sociology of science. Participating papers will be given 40 minutes (30 minutes talk, 10 minutes open discussion).

Submission requirements and deadline:

  • Authors should send abstracts to dana.jalobeanu@gmail.com. Abstracts should not exceed 500 words and should be prepared for blind review (no author-identifying information in the body of the abstract).  All submissions should be in PDF or Word format. Please include the following in the body of your e-mail: name, academic affiliation, paper/presentation title.
  • The deadline for submitting your abstract to the above e-mail address is February 15, 2013.
  •  Authors will be notified of the program committee’s decision by February 20, 2013.

Conference fee:

None.

Further opportunities: 

Participants might also consider attending the “Experiments and the Arts of Discovery in Early Modern Europe” workshop that will take place at the same venue on May 12-14. The list of participants for this workshop includes Peter Anstey, Arianna Borelli, Sorana Corneanu, Maarten van Dyck, Mordechai Feingold, Daniel Garber, Benedino Gemelli, Guido Giglioni, Albrecht Heeffer, Vera Keller, Sergius Kodera, Kathryn Murphy, Stephen Pumfrey, Evan Ragland, Jonathan Regier, Justin Smith, Ian Stewart, Alberto Vanzo and Koen Vermeir.

Contact: 

If you have any further questions about the conference, travel arrangements, accommodation etc., you can send an e-mail to claudia.dumitru1@gmail.com. Please bookmark this post for further updates.

Workshop: The arts of experimenting between practices and forms of writing: The case of experientia literata

The arts of experimenting between practices and forms of writing:

 The case of experientia literata

Faculty of Philosophy

University of Bucharest

6-7 December 2012

 

Organizer: Dana Jalobeanu

Organizing and program committee:

Mihnea Dobre, Sandra Dragomir, Claudia Dumitru, Sebastian Mateiescu, Cesare Pastorino

This is an interdisciplinary workshop organized in the framework of the project From natural history to science (CNCS grant PN-II-ID-PCE-2011-3-0719, contract no. 294/05/10/2011). Its purpose is to bring together students of early modern forms of experimentation and arts of discovery (such as Francis Bacon’s experientia literata and interpretatio naturae, Hooke’s philosophical algebra and different other forms of ‘inductive reasoning’, methodological reflections etc.). One set of questions we will address in our two-day workshop regards the context, formation and evolution of Francis Bacon’s art of experimenting, experientia literata. Another set of questions regards the reception and transmission of Baconian methodology of experimentation in the second part of the seventeenth century.

The workshop will bring together researchers coming from different fields of early modern studies, such as natural history, natural philosophy, history of early modern ideas, history of dialectics, history of medicine, and history of philosophy. We have tried to limit the number of papers and give plenty of time for discussions. For this purpose, each day will end with a round-up discussion destined to recapitulate the questions of the day, sharpen and elaborate topics of further research etc.

Invited speakers and participants (in alphabetical order): Daniel Andersson (University of Oxford), Sorana Corneanu (University of Bucharest, Romania), Iovan Drehe (Babes Bolyai University Cluj Napoca, Romania), Mihnea Dobre (University of Bucharest), Claudia Dumitru (University of Bucharest), Laura Georgescu (Ghent University, Belgium), Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest), James Lancaster (The Warburg Institute, University of London), Cathay Liu (Yale-NUS College, Singapore), Oana Matei (Western University Vasile Goldis Arad, Romania), Sebastian Mateiescu (University of Bucharest), Cesare Pastorino (University of Sussex, UK), Richard Serjeantson (Cambridge University, UK).

 

Programme:

Thursday 6th December

09:00-09:30     Opening addresses, coffee and cookies

09:30-10:30     Cesare Pastorino (University of Sussex), Francis Bacon’s Early Formulations of Experientia Literata

10:30-11:00     Coffee Break

11:00-12:00     Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest), Bacon’s Mature Form of Experientia Literata and Its Practical Uses

12:00-13:00     Lunch

13:00-14:00     Iovan Drehe (Babes Bolyai University, Cluj), Rhetoric and the Baconian Experientia Literata

14.00-15.00     Sebastian Mateiescu (University of Bucharest), Francis Bacon on Potential Heat

15.00-15.30     Coffee Break

15:30-17.00     Round-up discussion: Bacon and Experiment

17.00-17.30     Tea, cookies

17.30-18.30     Invited talk: Daniel Andersson (University of Oxford), The Early Reception of Descartes in Hungary: A New Manuscript.

19:00   Dinner

 

Friday 7th December

09:00-09:30     Coffee and cookies

09:30-10:30     Richard Serjeantson (Cambridge University), Francis Willughby and the New Philosophy in Mid-Seventeenth Century England

10:30-11:00     Coffee Break

11:00-12:00     Oana Matei (Western University Vasile Goldis Arad, Romania), Vegetable Philosophy: John Evelyn’s Technologies of Amelioration

12:00-13:00     Lunch

13:00-14:00     Claudia Dumitru (University of Bucharest), Robert Hooke’s “Baconian Method”: Memory and Natural History

14:00-14:30     Coffee Break

14:30-15:30     Laura Georgescu (Ghent University), Processes of Experimentation: Gilbert’s

Investigation of Magnetic Motions

15:30-17:30     Round-up discussion: Forms of Experimentation in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy