World-makers: early modern philosophers and their cosmological projects

Oresme sfera elementala

Course given by: Dana Jalobeanu

Guest speakers: Kirsten Walsh (Institute for Research in Humanities, University of Bucharest), Michael Deckard (Fullbright Fellow, University of Bucharest)

Faculty of Philosophy

Splaiul Independentei 204

Wednesday from 2 pm (room Constantin Radulescu Motru)teniers

This is a third year optional course designed for the students following the module of theoretical philosophy (but other students, graduates or undergraduates are welcome to attend). The main aim of the course is to discuss the major figures, ideas and debates of the scientific revolution. We will focus on some of the important scientific and philosophical figures who contributed to the “scientific revolution” of the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Here are some of the questions we are going to ask: What does it mean to be a natural philosopher? Are there philosophical/scientific roles? Is natural philosophy a profession, a vocation or a (Christian) duty? How many competing philosophical roles there are?  Are they fundamentally different (say: the Aristotelian and the proponents of the “new” philosophy). Do all natural philosophers have something in common?P5151082

Our work hypothesis is that most of the proponents of the “new” natural philosophy (early modern science) were world-makers: they aimed to replace the traditional view of the universe; they aimed to reform the received knowledge, and sometimes also the received social and intellectual roles of knowledge makers. Our discussion will focus on some primary texts. We will especially look for how natural philosophers reflected on their public role when engaging in “world-making.” What did they claim they were doing? How did they justify the attempt to replace the “old, received view of the world” with a “new philosophy”?

The course will consist of one hour lecture and three hours of seminar. Course and seminars will mainly consist of discussions. Each meeting will concentrate on two readings: a primary source and a secondary source (supplementary reading material can be found in the associated folder in the common drop-box).kepler_chart

Each seminar will begin with a 20 minutes presentation of an author/representative figure of the scientific revolution and will continue with a discussion of the texts. Students are required to write and prepare such presentations (ppt. also required), trying to set the required readings in a historical context aiming to facilitate de understanding.

 

Course syllabus

 

Date Course and seminars Readings
07.10 Introduction: From the Scientific Revolution to the “scientific revolutions”: historiographical debates. Natural philosophy and early modern science. The iconic figures of the scientific revolution.

 

14.10 The cloister and the university: the received view of the world (I)

 

14.10 Seminar: Historiographical biases and the access to the primary sources

 

B.J.T. Dobbs, “The Janus Faces of Genius”
21.10 Teaching and learning natural philosophy in the traditional setting. What is natural philosophy before the scientific revolution?
21.10 The cloister and the university: the received view of the world (II)

Seminar

Reisch, Margarita philosophica (translation and commentary by Cunningham and Kusukawa)
28.10 The public life and the contemplative ideal of knowledge: Francis Bacon

 

28.10 Seminar: Francis Bacon

 

Francis Bacon, New Atlantis (also: Bacon’s letter to Launcelot Andrewes on Seneca, Demosthene and Cicero).
04.11 The Renaissance “mathematician” and the “new world:” Astronomy, astrology and practical mathematics from Copernicus to Kepler

 

Secondary reading:

Omodeo, Chapter 2

 

04.11 Seminar: Johannes Kepler Kepler, Astronomia nova, Introduction
11.11 Teaching the new science, from the university to the court: Galileo Galilei, mathematician and/or philosopher

 

Secondary reading: Biagioli, Galileo’s instruments of credit, Introduction, Chapter 1

Supplementary reading:

11.11 Seminar: Galileo Galilei Galileo Galilei, Dialogue on the two new world systems, Day 1
18.11 Natural magic and experimental philosophy: Giovan Battista della Porta and William Gilbert

 

Giovan Battista della Porta, Natural Magic, introduction (the course will be organized as a reading group too!!)
18.11 Seminar: William Gilbert, experimental philosophy and cosmology William Gilbert, De magnete, book VI, ch. 1-3

Secondary reading: Freudenthal, Gilbert’s cosmology

Suppementary reading: Gatti, Giordano Bruno and the Renaissance Science, chapter IV (Bruno and Gilbert’s group)

 

24.11 The Christian virtuoso and the new science in England. Robert Boyle and the early Royal Society

 

24.11 Seminar: Robert Boyle, Christian virtuoso Boyle, Christian virtuoso
02.12 The first “professional”: Robert Hooke’s experimental philosophy and the Royal Society
02.12 Seminar: Robert Hooke Hooke, Micrographia (Preface)

Hooke,  A general scheme…

09.12 World makers: Descartes and Newton
09.12 Seminar: Descartes and Newton Descartes, Le Monde (chapters 1, 6, 7)

Newton, De gravitatione

16.12 The private and the public face of the natural philosopher: Newton

 

16.12 Seminar Newton Dibner Ms 1031 b

Hypothesis on Light

06.01 Utopia and the Royal Society: Oldenburg, Evelyn, Wilkins, Beale on the reformation of knowledge, the advancement of learning and various utopian ‘scientific’ projects

 

Secondary reading: Lynch, Solomon’s Child
06.01 Seminar on the utopian plans of the FRS Henry Oldenburg – correspondence

RH – the continuation of New Atlantis

Cowley – the plan for organizing Royal Society

13.01 Communicators and promoters of the new science. The public face of science

 

13.01 Women philosophers
20.01 Colloquium

 

Assignments

Seminar presentation: introduce the author (30% of the evaluation)

The seminar will begin with a 20 min presentation of the author whose text is under discussion. Students are required to choose one author and to prepare such a presentation, focusing on the context of the text for the seminar and the relevant details for its understanding. In introducing an author it is important to emphasize what was his/her general plan/project and how does our reading relate to that more general plan. Also, I would like to know more about the intellectual context in which our author’s ideas have developed, about his intellectual sources, friends and foes, about his successes (in his own time: was he read? Did he have students and followers?) and failures (What did he hoped to achieve? How much did he manage to do? What prevented him to do more?  How did he/she reflect on the causes of his/her failure?). Try to reconstruct a portrait as free as possible from the various biases of the various historiographies.

 

Analyze a primary source (from the bibliography) (30% of the evaluation)

Write a 4-6 pages ‘introduction’ to a primary source from the bibliography. Explain its main ideas, define its terms, place it in the context (among the author’s other writings, for example), provide the reader with the appropriate footnotes (definitions, explanations of terms, references to the background etc.) and the running commentary that would help her understand the text better. Show at what points in your analysis the reader might benefit from reading secondary literature and why. What are the difficult problems this text is posing? What kind of problems are they? (terminological, conceptual, contextual, interpretative) What do we need in order to solve them?  Draft a list of questions and a bibliography which might help the reader solve some of these questions.

 

Discuss secondary literature referring to a primary source (30 % of the evaluation)

Select and discuss two secondary sources referring to the author/primary source you have worked on. Use the bibliography and ask for help when you need it.

Date Course and seminars Readings
07.10 Introduction: From the Scientific Revolution to the “scientific revolutions”: historiographical debates. Natural philosophy and early modern science. The iconic figures of the scientific revolution.

 

14.10 The cloister and the university: the received view of the world (I)

 

14.10 Seminar: Historiographical biases and the access to the primary sources

 

B.J.T. Dobbs, “The Janus Faces of Genius”
21.10 Teaching and learning natural philosophy in the traditional setting. What is natural philosophy before the scientific revolution?
21.10 The cloister and the university: the received view of the world (II)

Seminar

Reisch, Margarita philosophica (translation and commentary by Cunningham and Kusukawa)
28.10 The public life and the contemplative ideal of knowledge: Francis Bacon

 

28.10 Seminar: Francis Bacon

 

Francis Bacon, New Atlantis (also: Bacon’s letter to Launcelot Andrewes on Seneca, Demosthene and Cicero).
04.11 The Renaissance “mathematician” and the “new world:” Astronomy, astrology and practical mathematics from Copernicus to Kepler

 

Secondary reading:

Omodeo, Chapter 2

 

04.11 Seminar: Johannes Kepler Kepler, Astronomia nova, Introduction
11.11 Teaching the new science, from the university to the court: Galileo Galilei, mathematician and/or philosopher

 

Secondary reading: Biagioli, Galileo’s instruments of credit, Introduction, Chapter 1

Supplementary reading:

11.11 Seminar: Galileo Galilei Galileo Galilei, Dialogue on the two new world systems, Day 1
18.11 Natural magic and experimental philosophy: Giovan Battista della Porta and William Gilbert

 

Giovan Battista della Porta, Natural Magic, introduction (the course will be organized as a reading group too!!)
18.11 Seminar: William Gilbert, experimental philosophy and cosmology William Gilbert, De magnete, book VI, ch. 1-3

Secondary reading: Freudenthal, Gilbert’s cosmology

Suppementary reading: Gatti, Giordano Bruno and the Renaissance Science, chapter IV (Bruno and Gilbert’s group)

 

24.11 The Christian virtuoso and the new science in England. Robert Boyle and the early Royal Society

 

24.11 Seminar: Robert Boyle, Christian virtuoso Boyle, Christian virtuoso
02.12 The first “professional”: Robert Hooke’s experimental philosophy and the Royal Society
02.12 Seminar: Robert Hooke Hooke, Micrographia (Preface)

Hooke,  A general scheme…

09.12 World makers: Descartes and Newton
09.12 Seminar: Descartes and Newton Descartes, Le Monde (chapters 1, 6, 7)

Newton, De gravitatione

16.12 The private and the public face of the natural philosopher: Newton

 

16.12 Seminar Newton Dibner Ms 1031 b

Hypothesis on Light

06.01 Utopia and the Royal Society: Oldenburg, Evelyn, Wilkins, Beale on the reformation of knowledge, the advancement of learning and various utopian ‘scientific’ projects

 

Secondary reading: Lynch, Solomon’s Child
06.01 Seminar on the utopian plans of the FRS Henry Oldenburg – correspondence

RH – the continuation of New Atlantis

Cowley – the plan for organizing Royal Society

13.01 Communicators and promoters of the new science. The public face of science

 

13.01 Women philosophers
20.01 Colloquium

 

Assignments

Seminar presentation: introduce the author (30% of the evaluation)

The seminar will begin with a 20 min presentation of the author whose text is under discussion. Students are required to choose one author and to prepare such a presentation, focusing on the context of the text for the seminar and the relevant details for its understanding. In introducing an author it is important to emphasize what was his/her general plan/project and how does our reading relate to that more general plan. Also, I would like to know more about the intellectual context in which our author’s ideas have developed, about his intellectual sources, friends and foes, about his successes (in his own time: was he read? Did he have students and followers?) and failures (What did he hoped to achieve? How much did he manage to do? What prevented him to do more?  How did he/she reflect on the causes of his/her failure?). Try to reconstruct a portrait as free as possible from the various biases of the various historiographies.

 

Analyze a primary source (from the bibliography) (30% of the evaluation)

Write a 4-6 pages ‘introduction’ to a primary source from the bibliography. Explain its main ideas, define its terms, place it in the context (among the author’s other writings, for example), provide the reader with the appropriate footnotes (definitions, explanations of terms, references to the background etc.) and the running commentary that would help her understand the text better. Show at what points in your analysis the reader might benefit from reading secondary literature and why. What are the difficult problems this text is posing? What kind of problems are they? (terminological, conceptual, contextual, interpretative) What do we need in order to solve them?  Draft a list of questions and a bibliography which might help the reader solve some of these questions.

 

Discuss secondary literature referring to a primary source (30 % of the evaluation)

Select and discuss two secondary sources referring to the author/primary source you have worked on. Use the bibliography and ask for help when you need it.

 

Curs 09.10.2013: Curs introductiv

m81-82_flux_eder1024

Sursa imaginii: http://www.astroeder.com/images/m81-82_flux_eder150.jpg

1. Ce este cosmologia?

Definiții:

DEX: Cosmologie = „ramură a astronomiei care studiază structura și evoluția cosmosului și legile generale care îl conduc”.

Este o definiție înșelătoare, care sugerează apartenența cosmologiei la astronomie. În Enciclopedia lui d’Alembert, aceasta este prezentată în felul următor:

Cosmology. This word is formed by the combination of two Greek words, κόσμος, world, and λόγος, speech, which signifies the science which speaks of the world; that is to say the reason concerning the world in which we live and such as it actually exists.” (d’Alembert, Jean Le Rond. “Cosmology.” The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d’Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by John S.D. Glaus. Ann Arbor: MPublishing, University of Michigan Library, 2006. Web. 9 October 2013. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.678>. Trans. of “Cosmologie,” Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 4. Paris, 1754.)

O definiție mai recentă este următoarea:
Cosmologie = 1. Ramura filosofiei, considerată adesea o subdiviziune a metafizicii, care se ocupă de Univers ca totalitate a fenomenelor, încercând să combine într-un cadru coerent speculația metafizică și rezultatele științei. În perimetrul ei intră în general problemele privitoare la spațiu, timp, eternitate, necesitate, schimbare și contingență. Diferă prin metoda sa de cercetare rațională, de explicațiile pur mitice ale originii și structurii Universului.” (p. 81)
„2. Studiul științific modern al originii și structurii universului bazat pe instrumente de felul investigării spectrale a distribuției elementelor în Univers și al analizei stării spre roșu asociată Galaxiilor”. (Antony Flew (coord.). 1996. Dicționar de filozofie si logica. București: Humanitas, pp. 81-82)

În afara cosmologiei, este important să spunem și ce se înțelege prin univers.
Univers și univers = prezența sau absența majusculei la începutul cuvântului servește la distingerea a două sensuri ale acestui cuvânt. 1. „Universul” se definește ca incluzând tot ceea ce există, cu excepția Dumnezeului creator, dacă acesta este admis. 2. Un univers nu poate fi decât o parte a acestui Univers: despre nebuloasa Andromeda, bunăoară, s-a spus uneori că este „un univers insular”. În acest sens, filosofii vorbesc uneori de universuri de discurs diferite, ca de pildă, cel a fizicii ca opus celui al criticii de artă.” (A. Flew, p. 347)

Conform lui Edward Harrison, cosmologia și universul sunt discutate în felul următor (Harrison, Edward. 2000. Cosmology. The Science of the Universe. 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press.):
„Cosmology, the science of the universe”
Științele se ocupă de decuparea și de fărâmițarea lucrurilor pentru a își putea determina domeniul de aplicabilitate.

Univers = realitatea ca atare.
univers = un model al Universului.

„Cosmology is the study of universes, how they originate, how they evolve” (p. 1).
„The Universe is everything and includes us thinking about what to call it. … It has many faces and means many different things to different people. … Cosmic pictures evolve because cultures influence one another, and because knowledge advances. … If the word „Universe” is used we must distinguish between the various „models of the Universe.” … When used alone, without specification of the model we have in mind, it conveys the impression that we know the true nature of the Universe.” (Harrison, p. 13)
„Cosmology is the study of universes. In the broadest sense it is a joint enterprise by science, philosophy, theology, and the arts that seeks to gain understanding of what unifies and is fundamental.” (Harrison, p. 15)

Consecințele de până acum ar putea fi descrise în felul următor:
• Cosmologia nu are specializarea științelor standard.
• Cosmologia este o disciplină foarte veche: orice imagine despre lume este o cosmologie. Orice model de univers este coerent în sine, fiind relevant pentru un anumit context socio-cultural. (astfel, mitul poate furniza o imagine a lumii, la fel ca modelele spirituale, religioase, filosofice, sau științifice).

2. Cosmologia filosofică vs. științifică – O dezbatere (G. J. Whitrow & H. Bondi, „Is physical cosmology a science?” BJPS, 4:16 (1954), pp. 271-283.

Întrebarea care se ridică acum este ce înțelegem prin cosmologia filosofică? Care este acel element ce face din cosmologie un obiect de interes pentru filosofi? Care sunt acele aspecte ale cosmologiei ce nasc întrebări și reflecții de natură filosofică?

Răspunsuri la aceste întrebări vor fi oferite în diferite stadii ale cursului, în funcție de materialul parcurs și competențele dobândite. Pentru moment însă, afirmația fundamentală asupra căreia vrem să ne oprim este că prin natura sa, o dezbatere asupra aspectelor filosofice ale cosmologiei duce în mod inevitabil la o discuție asupra naturii științei, în general. Iar o asemenea analiză constituie fără îndoială și apanajul filosofiei, fapt dovedit atât de istoria filosofiei cât și de multiplele întrebări cosmologice susceptibile de răspunsuri justificabile din punct de vedere filosofic.

Oferim aici, cu titlu de exemplificare a acestei situații, un scurt rezumat al unei dispute petrecute în anii 1950’, nu între filosofi, ci chiar între cosmologi. Ne referim aici la dialogul dintre G. J. Whitrow și H. Bondi, cel din urmă chiar unul dintre artizanii modelului cosmologic al stării staționare (Steady-state), dialog redat în paginile revistei British Journal for the Philosophy of Science sub titlul: G. J. Whitrow & H. Bondi, „Is physical cosmology a science?” BJPS, 4:16 (1954), pp. 271-283.

În acest schimb de idei asupra statutului filosofic vs. științific al cosmologiei, Whitrow adoptă poziția filosofului și consideră că în cosmologie întrebările cât și răspunsurile nu pot fi separate de interpretări filosofice, pe când Bondi susține cu tărie imunitatea cosmologiei față de filosofie.

Argumentele fiecăruia dintre combatanți merită atenție deplină întrucât relevanța lor este valabilă pentru o discuție generală asupra statutului filosofic al cosmologiei.

Iată câteva dintre aceste puncte divergente asupra științei:

Puncte divergente – natura științei:
• scopul oamenilor de știință este obținerea unanimității în interpretarea rezultatelor științifice vs. scopul oamenilor de știință este obținerea validării experimentale și supunerea teoriilor științifice principiului falsificabilității
[potrivit lui K. Popper, principiul falsificabilității poate fi enunțat astfel: “statements or systems of statements, in order to be ranked as scientific, must be capable of conflicting with possible, or conceivable observations” (K. Popper, Conjectures and refutations. The growth of scientific knowledge, New York: Basic Books. 1962, p. 39)].
• natura și interpretarea principiului falsificabilității: falsificabilitatea este supusă obținerii unanimității între oamenii de știință vs unanimitatea este supusă criteriului falsificabilității teoriilor științifice

Puncte comune – natura științei:
• știința este un demers obiectiv, care nu depinde de opiniile personale ale omului de știință
• teoriile științifice tind către obținerea celor mai simple explicații
• în știință, se acordă o importanță majoră a experimentului
• știința țintește spre un acord general sau chiar universal al oamenilor de știință cu privire la rezultatele lor
• cunoașterea în știință evoluează cumulativ

Pozițiile opuse asupra naturii științei determină la rândul lor interpretări diferite asupra statutului filosofic vs. științific al cosmologiei:

Puncte divergente – natura cosmologiei:
• întrebările filosofice sunt preluate în timp de către știința cosmologiei (analogie: întrebările filosofice clasice despre spațiu și timp au fost preluate în teoria relativității) vs. întrebările filosofice din cosmologie nu vor putea fi tratate complet în cosmologia științifică
• stabilirea statutului filosofic vs. științific al cosmologiei presupune o anumită raportare la istoria gândirii: începe cosmologia o dată cu filosofia sau mai degrabă este cosmologia un domeniu recent, provenind din știința modernă?
• starea de fapt din cosmologie, anume existența unor diferite modele în cosmologie vs. existența unui „singur” univers observabil duce sau nu la opțiuni filosofice între aceste modele?

Prezentare curs Cosmologie filosofica 1

Cosmologie Filosofică 1: De la Platon la Einstein

Anul universitar 2013-2014, Semestrul I

Curs susținut în colaborare de Dana Jalobeanu, Mihnea Dobre si Sebastian Mateiescu

Miercuri, 16-18, Amfiteatrul Titu Maiorescu

 

Prezentare generală:
Cursul își propune o introducere în problematica filosofică a cosmologiei, de la origini și până la începutul secolului XX. Deși vom lucra cu un material istoric, abordarea va fi tematică, problematică, conceptuală și comparativă.

Format:
Cursul va fi construit dintr-o serie de prelegeri introductive organizate în trei module tematice. Fiecare serie dintr-un modul se va încheia cu o discuție de seminar (discuție recapitulativă și seminar pe text). În paralel cu întâlnirile săptămânale, cursul va avea o componentă on-line de tip blog.

Evaluare:
Vor fi două colocvii de evaluare :

  1. În cadrul seminarului (3 întâlniri au fost dedicate activităților de seminar), studenții vor avea de pregătit o prezentare de 5 minute (2 slide-uri ppt.) pe tema “Ce am învățat până acum de la acest curs?” Prezentările vor avea loc în cadrul unei întâlniri evaluative de tip colocviu si sunt obligatorii pentru participarea la colocviul final de evaluare.
  2. La final, vom organiza un colocviu de evaluare. Fiecare student va avea de pregătit un text de max. 3 pagini și o prezentare de 10 minute (4 slide-uri) pe tema : “Cursul care lipsește” (Ce curs a lipsit din lista de prelegeri ? Cum ar trebui el ținut ? Cum ar arăta planul acestui curs ? Ce ar urmări ? Ce bibliografie ați sugera etc.)

 

Tematica cursului:
1. 2 octombrie. Discutie introductiva
Inscrieri la curs. Inscrierea se face prin email: la mihneadobre@yahoo.com pana in data de 15 octombrie.
2. 9 octombrie. Cosmologie si filosofie. Intrebari fundamentale
 

Modulul I : Ordine
3. 16 octombrie Universul “aristotelic”: o lume închisă, sau o lume armonică? (Dana Jalobeanu)
4. 23 octombrie. Universul care decade: „independența” materiei? (Mihnea Dobre)
5. 30 octombrie. Eternitate sau creatie? Design și principiul antropic  (Sebastian Mateiescu)
6.  6 noiembrie Seminar Ordine și Design
Seminar de lectură pe 3 texte ilustrative la care s-a făcut referire în cele trei prelegeri de curs.

Modulul II : Reprezentare
7. 13 noiembrie Reprezentări cosmologice 1: De la alegorii cosmologice la universul armonic al lui Kepler (Dana Jalobeanu)
8. 20 noiembrie Reprezentări cosmologice 2: De la o ierarhie a cerurilor la reprezentări geometrice. (Mihnea Dobre)
9. 27 noiembrie Reprezentări cosmologice 3: Universul static versus universul dinamic. Universul bloc și tipul de reprezentare în geometriile non-euclidiene. Cosmologia în teoria relativității. (Sebastian Mateiescu)
10. 4 decembrie Seminar: Reprezentări cosmologice
Textele vor fi anunțate ulterior.

Modulul III : Spațiu și timp
11. 11 decembrie Spațiu și Timp 1: Timpul în filosofia tradițională  (Dana Jalobeanu)
12. 18 decembrie Spațiu și Timp 2: relativ vs absolut (Mihnea Dobre)
13. 8  ianuarie Spațiu si Timp 3: Modelul cosmologic al universului oscilatoriu, Singularități, modelul „Steady-State”, Big-Bang (Sebastian Mateiescu)
14. 15 ianuarie. Seminar: Evaluare finala

Bibliografie pentru studenți:
Koyre, Alexandre. De la lumea închisă la universul infinit. Humanitas, 1997
Koestler, Arthur. Lunaticii, Humanitas, 1996.
Barrow, John. Originea universului, Humanitas, 1994.

Bibliografie suplimentara:
Barrow, John; Tipler, Frank & Wheeler, John. The Anthropic Cosmological Principle, OUP, 1986.
Cornford, Francis Macdonald, and Plato. Plato’s Cosmology : The Timaeus of Plato Translated with a Running Commentary.  London: Routledge, 1937.
Duhem, Pierre. “To Save the Phenomena. An Essay on the Idea of Physical Theory from Plato to Galileo.” To save the phenomena. An essay on the idea of physical theory from Plato to Galileo., by Duhem, P.. Chicago, IL (USA): University of Chicago Press, 120 p. 1 (1969).
Duhem, Pierre Maurice Marie, and Roger Ariew. Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985.
Field, J. V. Kepler’s Geometrical Cosmology.  London: Athlone, 1988.
Freudenthal, Gad. “Theory of Matter and Cosmology in William Gilbert’s De Magnete.” ISIS 74, no. 1 (1983): 22-37.
Harper, William L. Isaac Newton’s Scientific Method: Turning Data into Evidence About Gravity and Cosmology.  Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Jammer, Max. Concepts of Space. The History of theories of Space in Physics, Dover, 1993.
Reichenbach, Hans. The Philosophy of Space and Time, Dover Books, 1957.
Sklar, Lawrence. Space, Time and SpaceTime, University of California Press, 1974.
Sorabji, Richard. Matter, Space, and Motion: Theories in Antiquity and Their Sequel.  Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1988.
———. Philoponus: And the Rejection of Aristotelian Science. 2nd ed. ed.  London: Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2010.
———. Time, Creation and the Continuum: Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages.  London: Duckworth, 1983.
Westman, Robert. “The Astronomer’s Role in the 16th Century: A Preliminary Study.” History of Science 18 (1980): 105-47.
———. The Copernican Question: Prognostication, Skepticism, and Celestial Order.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.
Westman, Robert S. The Copernican Achievement. Contributions of the Ucla Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975.